Bottomline: that seductive looking “Upgrade” button in the WordPress dashboard that makes you think you can get away with just clicking it — and lulls you into a false sense of security by saying the upgrade was successful — do NOT click it unless you’ve done all the tasks in the WordPress Codex instructions for upgrading firstespecially the back-ups, and, ahem, then regarding reports of a successful installation, trust but verify.

Bonus tip: if you have set your Web host to back up your SQL database and blog files automatically, make sure it’s actually done that and then copy a few days of back-ups to your hard drive (both your files AND your SQL database). And another bonus tip: it doesn’t hurt to make sure your theme is compatible with WordPress 3.0 BEFORE you upgrade — or so I’ve heard.

I’m not sure if I got caught in WordPress permissions hell, or what, but my blog would not let me post, approve comments, or change any settings. However, after a couple of hours on the phone with a very patient and resourceful young lady in my Web host’s tech support department this afternoon, who then bumped my case up a level, I find tonight that I can post, and God willing, have full control of my blog again. I am so grateful!

My dear gentle readers, I missed you.

If you enjoy my blog, please buy me a cafe latte for $2.95, or cafe latte and a sandwich for $7.95, or add a salad for $11.95! May you be rewarded 10-fold for your kind gift by the prospering power of the universe!





How to Get Lots of Money for Anything -- Fast by Stuart Lichtman and Joe Vitale I bought How to Get Lots of Money for Anything — Fast! in August 2005 and use the knowledge in it every day. Its techniques for setting and achieving even seemingly-impossible objectives are based on brain function research AND THEY WORK! You will learn how to get your conscious and unconscious minds to work together to produce success while feeling joy, enthusiasm and certainty of achievement. I highly recommend this book. Cynthia Yockey

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I was browsing Twitter this morning and spotted a tweet by Jimmy Bise linking a post by Stacy McCain, who was connecting a New York Times piece about anosognosia to choice of political parties. “Anosognosia” describes the dilemma where you don’t know what you don’t know, which is why stupid people are not smart enough to know that they are stupid. Stacy sees this as an explanation for why some people are Democrats.

However, the piece at the New York Times that really got my attention was a headline in the sidebar: “What Broke My Father’s Heart.” It describes one woman’s unsuccessful quest to help her mother navigate the healthcare system to allow her father to have his pacemaker turned off so that he could die comfortably in hospice care.

This gave me quite the shot of adrenalin because my father’s life was saved in December 2008 by a pacemaker/defibrillator. I knew before it was installed that it is possible to turn them off to allow someone to die peacefully. Dad has made it very clear to his geriatrician that he wants hospice care when his time comes but the sentences I boldfaced below have sent me on a mission to review this possibility with him, in case we need to re-write Dad’s durable medical power-of-attorney :

From page 5 of the essay:

Over the next five months, my mother and I learned many things. We were told, by the Hemlock Society’s successor, Compassion and Choices, that as my father’s medical proxy, my mother had the legal right to ask for the withdrawal of any treatment and that the pacemaker was, in theory at least, a form of medical treatment. We learned that although my father’s living will requested no life support if he were comatose or dying, it said nothing about dementia and did not define a pacemaker as life support. We learned that if we called 911, emergency medical technicians would not honor my father’s do-not-resuscitate order unless he wore a state-issued orange hospital bracelet. We also learned that no cardiology association had given its members clear guidance on when, or whether, deactivating pacemakers was ethical.

From page 6 of the essay: (Last month that changed. The Heart Rhythm Society and the American Heart Association issued guidelines declaring that patients or their legal surrogates have the moral and legal right to request the withdrawal of any medical treatment, including an implanted cardiac device. It said that deactivating a pacemaker was neither euthanasia nor assisted suicide, and that a doctor could not be compelled to do so in violation of his moral values. In such cases, it continued, doctors “cannot abandon the patient but should involve a colleague who is willing to carry out the procedure.” This came, of course, too late for us.)

FYI, if you want someone to be able to make medical decisions for you when you can’t make them for yourself, the instrument to create is a durable medical power-of-attorney, NOT a living will. A living will is just evidence of heroic measures you don’t want to have, but it doesn’t allow someone to direct your care according to your values.

The author of the piece, Katy Butler, strikes me as an unresourceful person who was passive about her father’s end-of-life care, no matter how much she says she Googled. She unwittingly describes blunder after blunder that she made, or did not stir herself sufficiently to prevent her mother from making. For one thing, her father had the right to refuse medical care, so she could have fired the cardiologist who refused to turn off the pacemaker and replaced him with the hospice doctor, who really should have been in charge of her father’s care totally once he was admitted to hospice. She also does not say why her father was transported from home hospice care to the hospital when he developed pneumonia and she does not say whether he remained in hospice care in the hospital. If the end is coming and you panic and call 911, then you are back in the acute care system and deserve your wretched fate from completely inappropriate care.

On the other hand, if Butler’s father was receiving hospice care in the hospital — that is, comfort care such as medication for pain and anxiety and oxygen to treat air hunger — then I have no patience with Butler’s self-pity and rage with the system that her father took five days to die. Death is not pretty and it does not care about your busy schedule. Pain is one of the measures Death applies to get you to let go of life and to make your loved ones willing to release you. From the dying loved ones whom I have attended, it looks to me like our souls look back on their current life, and forward to the next life, back and forth, back and forth, as if they are gathering their wits and summoning their courage to make the leap. Pain medications, titrated to the extreme, mind-boggling amounts of pain associated with dying, seem to help this process rather than hastening it. The duty of caregivers at this time is to attend to their dying loved one by providing every comfort in their power, by creating an environment of peace and courage and by letting the dying process take as long as it takes.

I am going to have to be doing this again, soon.

P.S.

If you have a pacemaker, or provide care for a loved one who does, here’s info from the American Medical Association (the article has many useful links):

It is legal and ethical to honor patient requests to deactivate implanted cardiac devices, and physicians should take the initiative in talking with terminally ill patients and their families about turning off the devices, according to a new expert panel consensus statement released in May.

Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, or ICDs, can impose a particularly heavy burden on terminally ill patients, continuing to send electrical shocks as the patient dies. [Note from CY: These shocks feel like a mule kick to the chest.]

(snip)

Nearly three-fifths of hospices reported patients getting shocked by their ICDs within the past year, said a March 2 Annals of Internal Medicine study. Only 10% of the 414 hospices surveyed had policies on deactivating ICDs, and 58% of the terminally ill patients who received shocks did not have their devices turned off.

The Heart Rhythm Society panel, which included representatives from the American College of Cardiology, the American Geriatrics Society, the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, and the American Heart Assn., set out to address the problem by clarifying the legal and ethical status of deactivating cardiac devices. The consensus statement also advises physicians on how to communicate with patients and families about whether to turn off a device.

There are no court cases dealing directly with deactivating heart devices, but the legal and ethical principle that patients and their surrogates have the right to refuse care is solidly grounded, said panel member George J. Annas.

“The closest and most controversial cases are the feeding tube cases. When you take out the feeding tube, you know the patient is going to die,” said Annas, chair of the Dept. of Health Law, Bioethics & Human Rights at Boston University School of Public Health. “Every court has looked at these cases and said, ‘It’s medical technology.’ You can refuse a ventilator, you can refuse a feeding tube, you can refuse anything.”

Patients have the right to refuse care, said Richard A. Zellner, a retired lawyer who served as the panel’s patient representative. He had five implanted heart devices over 14 years before getting a heart transplant in 2006.

“The patient has a right to say, ‘I don’t want any more treatment,’ ” said Zellner, an adjunct lecturer in the Case Western Reserve University Dept. of Bioethics in Ohio. “When the patient says, ‘I’ve had enough,’ that’s enough.”

I promise a post is coming soon with photos of my heirloom tomato plants.

If you enjoy my blog, please buy me a cafe latte for $2.95, or cafe latte and a sandwich for $7.95, or add a salad for $11.95! May you be rewarded 10-fold for your kind gift by the prospering power of the universe!





How to Get Lots of Money for Anything -- Fast by Stuart Lichtman and Joe Vitale I bought How to Get Lots of Money for Anything — Fast! in August 2005 and use the knowledge in it every day. Its techniques for setting and achieving even seemingly-impossible objectives are based on brain function research AND THEY WORK! You will learn how to get your conscious and unconscious minds to work together to produce success while feeling joy, enthusiasm and certainty of achievement. I highly recommend this book. Cynthia Yockey

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Ace has written a couple of excellent posts about what Congressman Joe Barton should have said instead of apologizing the BP CEO Tony Heyward. I particularly like the following observation from Ace, which he added after his list of questions that Congressman Barton should have asked Mr. Heyward (boldfacing mine):

Arguments don’t change mind. Theories don’t change minds. Rhetoric doesn’t change minds.

Facts change mind. Facts.

That’s why internet traffic doesn’t spike just because Charles Krauthammer has a good video up, or Ann Coulter wrote a trenchant column, but instead spikes when a scandalous political story is breaking.

Because everyone knows that if opinions are going to change dramatically in this country, it will be fresh facts, not fresh arguments (and not oft-repeated arguments, certainly) that will do it.

The internet slows down when a Big Fact is coming down the tubes. Because everyone recognizes the power of a new fact. We either wait for it excitedly or dread it coming, but we all know, it could change things.

In any breaking story, a news junkie skips past the channels that are offering analysis and more talking headery and goes to the one that seems to be offering fresh fact.

Every big blog day I’ve had wasn’t due to analysis or commentary, or even attacking commenters. It was due to a big news, new fact.

I just do not understand how everyone knows this, intuitively, and yet doesn’t seem to really know it all.

This is timely for me as I make the conservative case for lesbian and gay equality — it gives me the target to hit: fresh facts. And I DO have them. Come to think of it, it was exposure to facts during the 2008 presidential campaign that converted me to fiscal conservatism. Hmmmm.

See Ed Morrissey at Hot Air for the background on how Barton’s attempt to make Obama accountable for his “shakedown” of BP for the $20 billion escrow fund/Democrat corruption lottery prize went … awry.

If you enjoy my blog, please buy me a cafe latte for $2.95, or cafe latte and a sandwich for $7.95, or add a salad for $11.95! May you be rewarded 10-fold for your kind gift by the prospering power of the universe!





How to Get Lots of Money for Anything -- Fast by Stuart Lichtman and Joe Vitale I bought How to Get Lots of Money for Anything — Fast! in August 2005 and use the knowledge in it every day. Its techniques for setting and achieving even seemingly-impossible objectives are based on brain function research AND THEY WORK! You will learn how to get your conscious and unconscious minds to work together to produce success while feeling joy, enthusiasm and certainty of achievement. I highly recommend this book. Cynthia Yockey

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I’m AWOL until the tomatoes are planted

by Cynthia Yockey on June 14, 2010

in About Cynthia Yockey

I expect to finish getting my heirloom tomatoes planted tomorrow. I am sorry I’ve been AWOL most of the last week. I’m also sorry I thought the “Thrust in the Lord” post was funny — I have vacillated about deleting it but I think it will be better to update it with my apology and my reasons for apologizing. I’ll approve the backlog of comments as soon as I have that done.

I am sobered by the realization today that I need to get into much better physical shape to be able to handle activities like gardening and still have energy and clarity to write. I will have something to say about that, too. Thank you for your patience.

If you enjoy my blog, please buy me a cafe latte for $2.95, or cafe latte and a sandwich for $7.95, or add a salad for $11.95! May you be rewarded 10-fold for your kind gift by the prospering power of the universe!





How to Get Lots of Money for Anything -- Fast by Stuart Lichtman and Joe Vitale I bought How to Get Lots of Money for Anything — Fast! in August 2005 and use the knowledge in it every day. Its techniques for setting and achieving even seemingly-impossible objectives are based on brain function research AND THEY WORK! You will learn how to get your conscious and unconscious minds to work together to produce success while feeling joy, enthusiasm and certainty of achievement. I highly recommend this book. Cynthia Yockey

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What a friend we have in Jesus

by Cynthia Yockey on June 7, 2010

in Humor,LOLCats pictures

Funny Facebook Fails
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If you enjoy my blog, please buy me a cafe latte for $2.95, or cafe latte and a sandwich for $7.95, or add a salad for $11.95! May you be rewarded 10-fold for your kind gift by the prospering power of the universe!





How to Get Lots of Money for Anything -- Fast by Stuart Lichtman and Joe Vitale I bought How to Get Lots of Money for Anything — Fast! in August 2005 and use the knowledge in it every day. Its techniques for setting and achieving even seemingly-impossible objectives are based on brain function research AND THEY WORK! You will learn how to get your conscious and unconscious minds to work together to produce success while feeling joy, enthusiasm and certainty of achievement. I highly recommend this book. Cynthia Yockey

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Late this afternoon I planted seven kinds of basil: Genovese basil aka basil, large leaf Italian basil, mammoth basil, Siam Queen (Thai) basil, cinnamon basil, lemon basil and lime basil. What? I like basil. And it is particularly scrumptious with heirloom tomatoes.

I remember the first time I saw herb plants could come in so many variations was on a class trip from my high school to the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. They had a shop with basils and mints in several flavors and somehow that electrified me. In my senior year — 1971 — I begged my father to take me and a friend to the Flower Mart in Baltimore. I saw more varieties of basils and mints there, which interested me more than the flowers, although I would not get to grow them myself until 37 years later.

Another memory I have of Baltimore’s Flower Mart is a distinctive treat they sold — lemons with one end cut off and a thick, porous peppermint stick inserted so you could suck out the lemon juice through its vertical holes. I had to try one to see what the fuss was all about and found that peppermint sticks, however porous, are frustrating straws and don’t really sweeten the lemon juice that much.

BTW, the friend who went with me to the Flower Mart was Joan Ellis, who beat me for the role of Aldonza in our senior musical, Man of La Mancha, after I told her, like an idiot, to lose the Spanish accent for her second audition. In 1978 Joan created the role of Shy in Best Little Whorehouse in Texas for which she was nominated for a Tony.

I also planted parsley and coriander this afternoon. A few days ago I planted six patty pans squashes, which are my father’s favorite squash. I’ve gotten my 15-gallon tomato containers lined up on the lawn and labeled, with a corresponding map of what is going where on an 11 x 17 pad of graph paper. The next step is to test the soil, add the necessary amendments — which will be a combination of calcium, Miracle Gro potting mix, pine bark mulch and Perlite (the latter two are to ensure the tomato plant roots get enough air) — and then I will put up my deer fence.

The deer fence is black plastic ribbon about 5/8-inch wide that I wrap around stakes that are about six-to-eight feet apart at a height of about 30 inches. I put two sturdy stakes a few feet apart to act as a door — the ribbon there can be tied and untied. It works pretty well because I can spray the tape with anti-deer spray so they tend to move on to better-smelling plants and if the smell doesn’t work, they can’t see it very well in the dark so it freaks them out when they walk into it. The most delicate time for my tomato garden, deer-wise, is when I first put the plants in the containers because if they eat the growing tip of the plant, it can’t grow or won’t recover very fast, depending on how much it was chomped, so I’ve learned to replace it immediately with one of my back-up plants.

When the soil in the containers is ready and the deer fence is up, then I will plant all the tomato plants. The planting goes quickly — it’s the preparation that takes time.

I’ll take photos tomorrow and post some of them to show my progress. After I finished planting the basil and parsley, it was so breezy and cool just before sunset that I had Dad come out and sit on the porch for awhile just to enjoy seeing the wind in the trees and how everything looked crisp and sparkling after the rain this afternoon. Beauregard and Remington also came out to inspect their catnip patch near the front porch. I grew the plants from seed last year and this year they are flourishing, much to the satisfaction of the puss population.

Note: I started writing this post late on Sunday, June 6, so “today” means June 6, even though I didn’t publish the post until almost 1 am on June 7.

If you enjoy my blog, please buy me a cafe latte for $2.95, or cafe latte and a sandwich for $7.95, or add a salad for $11.95! May you be rewarded 10-fold for your kind gift by the prospering power of the universe!





How to Get Lots of Money for Anything -- Fast by Stuart Lichtman and Joe Vitale I bought How to Get Lots of Money for Anything — Fast! in August 2005 and use the knowledge in it every day. Its techniques for setting and achieving even seemingly-impossible objectives are based on brain function research AND THEY WORK! You will learn how to get your conscious and unconscious minds to work together to produce success while feeling joy, enthusiasm and certainty of achievement. I highly recommend this book. Cynthia Yockey

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DaTechguy’s drive to blog full-time

by Cynthia Yockey on June 4, 2010

in DaTechguy

I met Peter Ingemi at CPAC and like him very much. He is a loyal friend and linked my bleg last week, which I really appreciate. He is a Catholic and blogs as DaTechguy from the People’s Republic of Massachusetts. He got on the radar of the conservative blogosphere by traveling around Massachusetts with Stacy McCain during the Scott Brown Senate campaign.

Peter is unemployed but has discovered that he loves blogging and reporting. He also has learned that Andrew Sullivan got his start in full-time blogging by telling his readers how much money he needed to raise to go full-time. So he is following Andrew’s example in his own bid to make blogging and reporting his new career. Check it out. Peter is asking his readers to measure his worth in Andrew Sullivans. Little Miss Attila, who is an authority on these things, advises her readers that DaTechguy is worth several Andrew Sullivans.

If you enjoy my blog, please buy me a cafe latte for $2.95, or cafe latte and a sandwich for $7.95, or add a salad for $11.95! May you be rewarded 10-fold for your kind gift by the prospering power of the universe!





How to Get Lots of Money for Anything -- Fast by Stuart Lichtman and Joe Vitale I bought How to Get Lots of Money for Anything — Fast! in August 2005 and use the knowledge in it every day. Its techniques for setting and achieving even seemingly-impossible objectives are based on brain function research AND THEY WORK! You will learn how to get your conscious and unconscious minds to work together to produce success while feeling joy, enthusiasm and certainty of achievement. I highly recommend this book. Cynthia Yockey

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Is it just me, or does the “-ism” salesman remind you of anyone?

H/T: National Juggernaut.

If you enjoy my blog, please buy me a cafe latte for $2.95, or cafe latte and a sandwich for $7.95, or add a salad for $11.95! May you be rewarded 10-fold for your kind gift by the prospering power of the universe!





How to Get Lots of Money for Anything -- Fast by Stuart Lichtman and Joe Vitale I bought How to Get Lots of Money for Anything — Fast! in August 2005 and use the knowledge in it every day. Its techniques for setting and achieving even seemingly-impossible objectives are based on brain function research AND THEY WORK! You will learn how to get your conscious and unconscious minds to work together to produce success while feeling joy, enthusiasm and certainty of achievement. I highly recommend this book. Cynthia Yockey

{ 2 comments }

Be careful what you pray for

by Cynthia Yockey on June 4, 2010

in Cats,Humor,LOLCats pictures

funny pictures of cats with captions
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If you enjoy my blog, please buy me a cafe latte for $2.95, or cafe latte and a sandwich for $7.95, or add a salad for $11.95! May you be rewarded 10-fold for your kind gift by the prospering power of the universe!





How to Get Lots of Money for Anything -- Fast by Stuart Lichtman and Joe Vitale I bought How to Get Lots of Money for Anything — Fast! in August 2005 and use the knowledge in it every day. Its techniques for setting and achieving even seemingly-impossible objectives are based on brain function research AND THEY WORK! You will learn how to get your conscious and unconscious minds to work together to produce success while feeling joy, enthusiasm and certainty of achievement. I highly recommend this book. Cynthia Yockey

{ 2 comments }

Warner Todd Huston over at Right Wing News apparently thinks he has discovered racism in the existence of an all-black swimming meet that drew almost 750 teens from several states to compete in Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina. Huston doesn’t mind that the group is all-black  — freedom of association for private organizations and all that. What gets his goat is the legitimate point that if your goal is to compete and create champions, then the members of the group should be selected by merit, not color:

I do have a major problem with this story, though, and it was the above quote from young Kenny Cross of Raleigh. He said, “This is where champions are born.”

That they have fooled this young man into imagining that “champions” can come from a segregated event that is not filled with the best and brightest from every walk of life is a shame. Does this young man really think that only his black friends amount to “champions”? Does he think no other races could become champions?

The thing is, these kids are not competing against the best of all swimmers, they are merely competing with the best from their own small racial block. This is NOT how champions are made. Champions are made through wide spread competition and limiting yourselves to only specific blocks of people is not the way to create champions.

Let me tell you a story to explain why I think teen-aged and young adult blacks may really need all-black swim teams, colleges, whatever — although on their own dime, because, see banner above, “conservative lesbian.” Years ago I read a news story about a black young adult who explained to a reporter that he resented the racism he encountered from all his professors at the predominantly white university he attended so much that he transferred to a predominantly black university. However, much to his surprise, his black professors told him he was exactly the kind of jerk that his white professors had. To his credit, he then realized that his white professors were not being racist when they found fault with him — he was a jerk and it was their job to tell him so and set his feet on a better path. However, thanks to the Alinksky rule for radicals that identity group grievances must constantly be “rubbed raw,” this young man had no way of being able to distinguish between racial insults and accurate, if unflattering, feedback.

That’s why there is a legitimate place for all-black groups, especially when their mission is to develop excellence in children, teens and young adults. The process goes better when the participants don’t have to spend a single second pondering whether prejudice is animating how they are being treated. Removing that variable clears a host of mental and emotional obstacles to achieving excellence. Think of them as a bridge between childhood and adulthood that strengthens these individuals to be able to participate later in groups of diverse races, religions, sexual orientation and so on, with a strong self-confidence that CAN tell the difference between criticism that is justified and racist remarks intended to hurt and to be able to deal positively with both.

If you enjoy my blog, please buy me a cafe latte for $2.95, or cafe latte and a sandwich for $7.95, or add a salad for $11.95! May you be rewarded 10-fold for your kind gift by the prospering power of the universe!





How to Get Lots of Money for Anything -- Fast by Stuart Lichtman and Joe Vitale I bought How to Get Lots of Money for Anything — Fast! in August 2005 and use the knowledge in it every day. Its techniques for setting and achieving even seemingly-impossible objectives are based on brain function research AND THEY WORK! You will learn how to get your conscious and unconscious minds to work together to produce success while feeling joy, enthusiasm and certainty of achievement. I highly recommend this book. Cynthia Yockey

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